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1602 Map

Below is a short story I began in class.  It was inspired by a 1602 map, and written within the twenty or so minutes we had:   I was strolling along at dusk with the chill of the Thames sweeping across my neck, when I saw, in my state of bleary Flaneurism, a figure whom…

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Archived Family History

Equipped with my shiny new Reader’s Pass from the British Library, I felt the urge to go again and rummage through archives, just for the Hell of it. Something reminded me of my past.  Perhaps it was all of the studying I did of the novel Rodinsky’s Room, while working on my essay.  I felt compelled…

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Rain March

Tumbling veil of roses, blush pink and red like apples strung together fall around her face. Sucking in smells: oxygen rich plants crave her majesty’s light, twitching whiskers in twisting bushes I revel in nature’s underbelly. Sweet nectar perfume drips down, blue sky, falls valley of a granite storm Mother’s release of her pain. Black…

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Do you walk home?

The other day I decided to do my walk for the blog post.  I had been putting it off for some time, wanting to give myself ample hours to photograph and think.  As I normally take a cab, I decided that this time, I would walk from school to home, something I have avoided doing,…

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British Library Rummage

The British Library is wildly confusing: a glass tower with shelves inside, inside the shelves books, inside the books words, millions, billions of words, spilling out onto the floor, where hopefully someone’s brain will pick them up.  Arrows point to the lockers, to coffee, the cloakroom, the newsroom.  What is the difference between Humanities 1…

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Jake’s London

March 20, 8:00 PM, LONDON   Emily:What can you tell me about London? Jacob: It’s the capital of England. E: I mean in your own experience. J: My own experience? (Sighs) E: (Laughs) Okay, maybe not your most recent experience.  But just in general.  J: Well it was not too far on the train from where…

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The Blackest Streets

The Nichol was a dark place, narrower, grimier, than anywhere else in London in the early twentieth century.  Sarah Wise describes it at a place with shades of grey, rubbish, monotony of blackened buildings, broken furniture, smoke, ragged women, dead dogs, few beds.  It was known as “the Empire of Hunger.”  Its people struggled week…

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